About Alison

www.alisonmelville.com

Baroque Wanderers 2018 – Bruges, Copenhagen, Naestved

A travel agent friend once asked if I’d be interested in leading a travel group on a Baroque music-themed European sojourn. It sounded slightly crazy, but also as though it might just work, especially if my partner Colin was willing and able to come along as Co-Host. He was, and so last spring I put together an itinerary which was promoted by the agency. Lo and behold, twenty fellow travellers signed up, and off we went.

We started at the Händel Festival in Halle, Händel’s birthplace, where we saw wonderful concerts, toured the city, visited the Händel and CPE Bach Houses and other places of interest.

Then we headed to the Bach Festival in Leipzig, heard more fantastic concerts and saw much more, such as the Nikolaikirche:

And we ended up in Berlin, where the city kept us entertained. One day we moseyed to Frederick The Great’s Sanssouci in Potsdam…

It was a trip to remember, in every good way, and it’s happening again! We’ll be heading out in August 2018 to the Musica Antiqua Festival in Bruges, Belgium (six days) and then to Denmark, where we’ll spend three days in Copenhagen and then journey south for the Naestved Early Music Festival. Bruges and Naestved are both beautiful medieval cities, the festivals offer great concerts, and there are additional events planned, plus free time every day for independent exploring, relaxing, shopping, napping…If you’re interested in joining us, we’ll all first meet up at Brussels Airport, so you can arrive from anywhere! Double-click on the Baroque Wanderers 2018 description below to see more info, a day-to-day itinerary and other details, and if you want a copy of the registration form, contact me at alison@alisonmelville.com.

Baroque Wanderers 2018

Glissando

I’m delighted to be part of Ensemble Polaris, a motley crew of musicians whose diverse creative histories and broad array of musical interests make for some very entertaining and off-the-beaten-track collaboration. Since 2013 we’ve been playing live soundtracks for various films, starting with short films by Marcel Duchamps, Georges Méliès and Man Ray. Our most recent outing had us creating music for our first full-length movie, the historic documentary The Epic of Everest, which was presented by the Toronto Silent Film Festival. Ben Grossman was back with us for that project, playing vibraphone, and what a wonderfully surreal that whole evening was.

But since 2015 we’ve also been collaborating with faculty and students from Ryerson University’s Image Arts department, and we’ll soon have a DVD out which features work born of that activity. Here’s a sneak preview of the disc – Glissando, by Gerda Cammaer, with music by yours truly. It’s a lovely pocket film of a New Zealand fenicular railway ride, in both directions simultaneously. When I first saw it I had no knowledge of Gerda’s goal of creating a cinematic ‘lento pensivo’ – the music simply arrived in my head because of the way the film felt to me. Take a little look/listen:  https://vimeo.com/120089868

‘Breathe’ Revisited

About three years ago, I wrote here about a new piece called Breathe, written by Canadian composer James Rolfe for the new music presenter Soundstreams, and performed for them in 2011 by the Norwegian Trio Medieval and the Toronto Consort. The period of preparation and performance for that concert was a very bright few days, evocative, inspiring, and challenging. You can read the previous post and hear a concert version of the piece here: http://wp.me/s2XU04-breathe

In the world of new music, the premiere of a new work often turns out to be the only performance the piece receives, or one of only a very few. This is particularly true if the piece is written for an unusual grouping of performers: works for string quartets, for example, stand a much better chance for repeat performance than pieces for a non-standard instrumentation. Breathe, scored for three female voices, recorders, vielle/violin, lute, chamber organ and percussion, is certainly in that latter category. It was a beautiful piece, but its orchestration was pretty specific to its commissioner’s plans and didn’t fit any standard instrumentation. So last year, it was excellent to hear that James had received support from the Canada Council for the Arts to make a recording of Breathe and two other works. Great news! A rare chance to revisit the music, and an opportunity to make it accessible to a lot more people!

And last weekend, after a few very focused days of rehearsal, a crew of us headed down to Toronto’s Revolution Recording studios to commit Breathe to digital format. Also on the recording slate was Europa, a chamber cantata for soprano, baritone, Baroque flute, two violins, bass viol, theorbo and chamber organ, and originally written for Toronto Masque Theatre. With each piece being pretty complex and demanding, and about twenty minutes long, and with only three hours of recording time allotted to each, it was an intense day – but judging by the looks on the faces below, I think you can tell we had some fun! Energy very well spent.

Thanks to James for the music, to David F., David J. and Dennis for their efficiency and great ears, to Revolution for the beautiful space and friendly assistants, and to my fellow musicians for their talent, focus and teamwork. It was a real pleasure.

The CD is projected for release in the spring of 2017 on the Centrediscs label.

the-rolfe-europa-gang

The Europa crew, Revolution Recording, September 17/16. From left to right: James Rolfe, Aisslinn Nosky, Patricia Ahern, Felix Deak, Alexander Dobson, Suzie LeBlanc, David Jaeger, Paul Jenkins, David Fallis, Lucas Harris, Alison Melville and Dennis Patterson. Thanks to Dennis for the photo!

Old (music)/New (photography)

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the relevance of old music, Baroque music in particular. If it’s music that’s truly relevant in modern life, then what it expresses will resonate with other forms of artistic expression from today’s world. So I’ve begun exploring the combining of Baroque music with non-Baroque imagery, and here’s the first offering. My partner Colin Savage is a photographer and musician, and for many years now he’s been taking shots of abandoned, demolition-slated, decommissioned and otherwise ‘doomed’ buildings, using a Twin Lens Reflex camera (i.e., using a historical instrument to take photographs of old places…) as well as shooting in digital format. He put together a slideshow to a couple of tracks from a CD of mine. See how it strikes you. There’s more info on the music and the photos below.

Music: James Paisible (c.1656-1721), Grave/Adagio & Presto from Sonata VI for alto recorder & b.c. Yours truly, alto recorder; Lucas Harris, archlute; Joëlle Morton, bass viol. From the CD The Business of Angels (Pipistrelle Music, PIP 1110, 2010).

Photographs by Colin Savage. Locations: Muskoka Sanitorium (Gravenhurst, ON); General Electric Davenport Works, CNR Locomotive Shop, Don Valley Brickworks, National Rubber Industries (all in Toronto, ON); Bowmanville High School and Camp 30 (Bowmanville, ON); Houghton Industries, Lever Bros., Tower Automotive, New York Pork, and Kodak Canada (all in Toronto, ON).